Layden jar lab report

Layden jar lab report

This a guide line for the data I will use in the report, I just made it. Please make add what you can do and make my points more professional. Also put down numbers from the table to proof our words. Also add short conclusion if you can. The analysis shouldn’t be in bullet points I just made it in hurry. Thanks for help.

Results and discussions:

The manufacturer’s provided value for the uncertainty of the capacitance meter was given as ± 0.5% for the dial range up to 200pF. A ruler was used to measure the size of the containers. Data recorded by experimenters is shown in table 1, 2, 3. the new capacitance was recorded for 3 trails (attached in appindex).

 

copper foil Capacitance1 Avg.  (200 pF) Capacitance2 Avg.  (200 pF) Capacitance final3 (200 pF) Avg (200 pF) stDev
nothing 30.4 30.3 28.3 29.66 1.18462371
water 93.8 92.7 93.3 93.2666 0.550757055
salt water 97.9 94.5 107.3 99.9 6.630233782
alcohol 110.2 107.8 108.7 108.9 1.212435565
Aluminum foil
nothing 45 46.4 52.1 47.833 3.760762334
water 89.5 93.2 91.5 91.4 1.852025918
salt water 93.5 92.91 91.6 92.67 0.972471079
alcohol 116.5 118.8 117.5 117.6 1.153256259

 

In the table above we tested the capacitance for different liquid dielectric

  • We know that theoretically the dielectric constant for the water is higher than alcohol. And we know So the higher  dielectric constant the higher capacitance we should get. Adding salt to the water increases its dielectricity. Our result shows that alcohol has capacitance higher than water (error). Error acquired because the quantity of alcohol is more than water and human error. Also copper (foil) should have higher result than aluminum, error may resulted by the quantity we have used (aluminum more than copper) and human error.

dielectric

Nothing Water Salt Water Alcohol
Glass container 45.5333 103.833 84.5333 89.433
plastic container 45 89.5 93.5 116.5

 

In the above table we measured capacitance with different jar dielectric (galss and plastic).

  • The Glass jar have less than the half of the volume of the plastic jar gives higher result. The container volume is 5(3/4) cm^3 : APPROXIMATE Length 6 cm, Width 6 cm, Height 5 cm. Glass has diameter of ~4 cm and length of 5.5 cm.
  • Theoretically the glass has higher dielectric constant So our result was reasonable

 

Capacitor1 (200 pF) Capacitor2 (200 pF) Series (200 pF) theo. Series (200 pF)  Parallel (200 pF) theo. Parallel (200 pF)
167.6 100.5 60 62.82 255 268.1

 

In the above table we measured the capacitance for two capacitors placed in parallel and series. Also we calculated the theoretical value for each

  • Our experimental values (for series and parallel) close to the theoretical value
  • =

Appendix:

Collected data (attached)

Sample Calculation:

Average Capacitance :(47.2+45.4+44)/3 = 45.5333

Capacitors in parallel:  = 167.6+100.5= 268.1

Capacitors in Series:

 

DATA XLX

Can you construct a Leyden Jar that shows adequate precision for repeated measurements?
This experiment tests capacitance at different types of solution and material for conductor
The container volume is 5(3/4) cm^3 :  APPROXIMATE Length 6 cm, Width 6 cm, Height 5 cm,
Copper
Nothing
zero (200 pF) capacitance capitance final
0.1 30.5 30.4
0.2 30.5 30.3
0.2 28.5 28.3
avg 29.66667
Water
zero (200 pF) capacitance capitance final
0.2 94 93.8
0.3 93 92.7
0.4 93.7 93.3
avg 93.26667
Salt Water
zero (200 pF) Capacitance
0 97.9 97.9
0 94.5 94.5
0 107.3 107.3
avg 99.9
Alcohol
zero (200 pF) Capacitance
0 110.2 110.2
0 107.8 107.8
-0.2 108.5 108.7
avg 108.9
Aluminum Foil
Nothing
zero (200 pF) capacitance capitance final
0 45 45
0 46.4 46.4
0 52.1 52.1
avg 47.83333
Water
zero (200 pF) capacitance capitance final
0 89.5 89.5
0.2 93.4 93.2
0.2 91.7 91.5
avg 91.4
Salt Water
zero (200 pF) Capacitance
0 93.5 93.5
0.09 93.0 92.91
0 91.6 91.6
avg 92.67
Alcohol
zero (200 pF) Capacitance
0 116.5 116.5
0 118.8 118.8
0 117.5 117.5
avg 117.6
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